Interesting Articels on New Issue of Asian Policy

July 7, 2011 at 9:00 am 1 comment

The following information are from H-Japan list serv. All articles are looks interesting. Free access until August 31, 2011.

The new issue of NBR’s journal Asia Policy has just been released. All of this issue’s articles will be free to access for a limited time.

A listing of this issue’s contents and links are below:

ASIA POLICY 12 | July 2011

View the full volume: http://m.nbr.org/pwEgp

In this issue:

U.S. Re-engagement in Asia

In this Asia Policy roundtable, S.R. Joey Long, Simon Tay, Kumar Ramakrishna, Carlyle A. Thayer, and Zheng Wang assess U.S. engagement in Asia with a focus on how to better strengthen ties while navigating policy challenges, the financial crisis, resurgent extremist groups, and rising suspicions among regional players.

Read more: http://m.nbr.org/kqh0kK

The New Asianism: Japanese Foreign Policy under the Democratic Party of Japan

Daniel Sneider (Stanford University) examines the foreign policy views of the DPJ from the party’s founding through its first year in power. He argues that the “new Asianism,” which should not be understood as a pro-China shift but rather as an effort to manage the rise of China, remains a core identity of the DPJ.

Read more: http://m.nbr.org/kGT3Wb

Political Change in the DPRK

Is North Korea vulnerable to the types of revolutions sweeping the Middle East? In this Q&A, Asia Policy’s editor Andrew Marble discusses political change in the DPRK with Stephan Haggard (University of California-San Diego), and Daniel Pinkston (International Crisis Group, Seoul).

Read more: http://m.nbr.org/ldbZOL

Human Resources and China’s Long Economic Boom

Thomas G. Rawski (University of Pittsburgh) depicts how China’s economic boom rests on a historical accumulation of skills and capabilities far beyond the typical complement of human assets available to low-income nations.

Read more: http://m.nbr.org/kE2eiP

Exploring Regime Instability and Ethnic Violence in Kyrgyzstan

At least 350 people died and over 100,000 people were displaced in ethnic conflict in southern Kyrgyzstan one year ago. Eric McGlinchey (George Mason University) explores the causes of Kyrgyzstan’s political instability and the periodic violence surrounding the June 2010 riots.

Read more: http://m.nbr.org/iTwhlx

== BOOK REVIEWS ==

Roundtable | Red Star over the Pacific

In this book review roundtable, Dean Cheng, Rory Medcalf, Michael McDevitt, Bernard D. Cole, and Zheng Wang discuss Red Star over the
Pacific: China’s Rise and the Challenge to U.S. Maritime Strategy.
Included in the roundtable is a response essay by the book’s authors, Toshi Yoshihara and James R. Holmes.

Read more: http://m.nbr.org/mKhBJe

Essay | Is India Ready For Prime Time?

In this review essay, David J. Karl (Asia Strategy Initiative) discusses two books: Does the Elephant Dance? Contemporary Indian Foreign Policy by David M. Malone and Arming without Aiming: India’s Military Modernization by Stephen P. Cohen and Sunil Dasgupta.

Read more: http://m.nbr.org/lRd3eg

Download the full issue of Asia Policy (PDF): http://m.nbr.org/lG06mq

== ABOUT ==

ASIA POLICY is a peer-reviewed scholarly journal presenting policy-relevant academic research on the Asia-Pacific that draws clear and concise conclusions useful to today’s policymakers.

Read Asia Policy on Project MUSE:
http://muse.jhu.edu/journals/asia_policy/

Browse past issues of Asia Policy: http://m.nbr.org/imtScg

Tracy Timmons-Gray
The National Bureau of Asian Research (NBR) Seattle, WA

Entry filed under: Asian Studies. Tags: .

My LibGuides for Japanese Studies Grants Opportunity for Research at the Gordon W. Prange Collection, U of Maryland

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